The Brandon Inn has quite a history, marked by over twenty different owners over the past two-hundred plus years. The Inn actually began as a one-story tavern opened by Jacob Simonds in 1786. In 1812, a man named Matthew Birchard bought the tavern and added a store onto the east side. He renamed the tavern Birchard’s Tavern.

In 1822, the tavern became The Brandon House when Drances June bought it and made alterations with the help of architect and builder Colonel David Warren.

Yet more changes were made when William Field became the owner and enlarged the building so it could accommodate one hundred guests. He was the owner of the Rutland-Middlebury stage line, and from the time of his ownership of the Inn until 1926, a stage coach met all trains in order to transport guests to the Inn.

From 1860 and 1880, the property changed hands several times. Tragically, in 1880 virtually the entire building was destroyed by fire. The rescued furnishings were sold at an auction some time after the fire.

Luckily, the fire did not destroy the spirit of hospitality at the site, for in 1892 the new Hotel Brandon was opened by Frank E. Briggs and Charles M. Bliss. Their hotel had all the modern conveniences: steam heat, electric lights, hot and cold running water, private baths, and a telephone. The interior was constructed in the Dutch Colonial style of marble, brick, and wood. The hotel even had its own barbershop.

The present Brandon Inn retains the elegance and charm it had in its earlier days. Innkeepers Sarah and Louis Pattis have, like their predecessors, made their own alterations to the building, but have done so in keeping with the Dutch Colonial style established in the late 1890’s.

More importantly, however, though time has passed and many physical alterations have taken place at the Inn, the spirit of hospitality has endured. The Pattises are especially attuned to the needs of their guests, and have created a very personable and cozy atmosphere at the Inn. The rooms are spacious and very comfortable, and the various sitting rooms on the first floor provide the guests with a choice of atmospheres in which to relax.

In addition, guests typically comment that the food is outstanding, with varying dinner menus, and a hearty Vermont country breakfast offered every day.

All in all, in keeping with its history, The Brandon Inn is a true New England Country Inn. Coming to stay at the Inn is almost like coming home.